Appendix 5

The following research findings on the Transcendental Meditation and TM-Sidhi program, selected from the more than 600 research studies, are particularly significant for success in administration. The numbers in parentheses after the finding refer to the publication references of the original research papers, which are listed at the end of this document.

Automation in Administration

Automation in the administration of society is when the administration of society is problem-free, spontaneously preventing any misfortune from arising. This can only be achieved by enlivening the Constitution of the Universe—the Unified Field of Natural Law—in the collective consciousness of the society, which raises individual life and the life of the society as a whole to be in accord with Natural Law.
Coherence is created in the collective consciousness of society from the level of the Unified Field of Natural Law through the Maharishi Effect—the influence of harmony and orderliness generated by large groups of individuals participating together in the Transcendental Meditation and TM-Sidhi program.
The following research findings demonstrate that one per cent of a population practicing Maharishi’s Transcendental Meditation technique or the square root of one per cent collectively practicing Maharishi’s TM-Sidhi program radiate a powerful influence of coherence and harmony in collective consciousness, bringing life in accordance with all the Laws of Nature, neutralizing negative tendencies and promoting positive trends in society as a whole, thereby creating the basis for problem-free administration of the nation.

Improved Quality of City Life

  1. Decreased Crime (1)
  2. Decreased Violent Crime and Decreased Homicides (2)
  3. Decreased Automobile Accidents (3)
  4. Decreased Emergency Psychiatric Calls (4)
  5. Decreased Hospital Trauma Visits (4)
  6. Decreased Police Complaints (4)
  7. Improved Quality of City Life as Measured by an Index Comprising Data on Fires, Automobile Accidents, and Crime (3)

Improved Quality of Provincial Life

  1. Decreased Crime (5, 6)
  2. Decreased Traffic Fatalities (6)
  3. Decreased Unemployment (6)
  4. Improvement on an Overall Index Including Total Crime Rate, Mortality Rate, Motor Vehicle Fatality Rate, Auto Accident Rate, Unemployment Rate, Pollution, Alcoholic Beverage Consumption Rate, and Cigarette Consumption Rate (4)

Improved Quality of National Life

  1. Decreased Crime (3)
  2. Decreased Number of Fatalities from Suicide, Homicide, Accidents (7)
  3. Improved National Economy as Measured by Reduced Inflation and Unemployment (8)
  4. Increased International Economic Competitiveness (9)
  5. Stable Growth of Balanced Economic Health (9)
  6. Increased National Confidence, Optimism, and Economic Prosperity as Measured by Improvement in Stock Market Index (3)
  7. Improved Quality of National Life as Measured by an Index Comprising Data on Crime, the National Stock Market, and National Mood (3)
  8. Improvement on an Index of Motor Vehicle Fatalities, Homicides, and Suicides (7, 10)
    1. • Improvement on an Overall Index Including Motor Vehicle Fatalities, Homicide, and Suicide, Cigarette Consumption, Worker-Days Lost in Strikes
    2. (10)
  9. Improvement on an Overall Index Including Motor Vehicle Fatalities, Homicide, Suicide, Deaths Due to Accidents (other than Motor Vehicle), Notifiable Diseases, Alcohol Consumption, Cigarette Consumption (11)

Improved Quality of International Life

  1. Reduced International Conflict (12)
  2. Reduced Fatalities and Injuries Due to International Terrorism (12)
  3. Decreased War Intensity and Deaths (13)
  4. Increased Progress toward Peaceful Resolution of Conflict (13)
  5. Increased Harmony in International Relations (14)

Total Knowledge to Develop the Administrative Skill of Leaders of Society and of Every Citizen

1. Improved Brain Functioning, Increased Intelligence

Greater Use of Total Brain Functioning

  1. Mobilization of the Hidden Reserves of the Brain (15)
  2. Increased Efficiency of Information Transfer in the Brain (16–19)
  3. Greater Adaptability of Brain Functioning (20)
  4. Increased Blood Flow to the Brain (21)
  5. Increased Coherence of Brain Functioning (22–23)
  6. Maximum Coherence of Brain Wave Activity (Electroencephalogram— EEG) During Yogic Flying Practice of the TM-Sidhi Program (24–25)

Increased Intelligence and Mental Ability

  1. Increased Intelligence (26–30)
  2. Improved Memory (31–32)
  3. Accelerated Cognitive Development in Children (33–34)
  4. Increased Efficiency of Concept Learning (35)
  5. Broader Comprehension and Improved Ability To Focus Attention— Increased Field Independence (36–37)

Increased Creativity

  1. Enhanced Creativity (27, 38–39)
  2. Increased Innovation (27)
  3. Increased Cognitive Flexibility (31–32)

2. Greater Skill in Action and Increased Integration of Personality
Increased Administrative Skill

  1. Increased Job Effectiveness (40)
  2. Decreased Stress during Task Performance—Greater Physiological
    Calmness in the Midst of Job Activity (41)
  3. Increased Effectiveness (42)
  4. Increased Time Competence: Increased Ability to Think and Act
    Efficiently in the Present (43)
  5. Faster Reactions (44)
  6. More Effective Interaction with the Environment: Improved Resistance to Stress (45)
  7. Increased Job Satisfaction (46)

More Successful and Fulfilling Relationships

  1. Improved Work and Personal Relationships (47)
  2. Improved Relations with Co-Workers and Supervisors (48)
  3. Increased Sociability (49)
  4. Greater Marital Adjustment (50)
  5. Greater Family Health (51)

Growth of Positive Qualities

  1. Increased Self-Actualization: Increased Integration, Unity,
    and Wholeness of Personality (52–54)
  2. Higher Levels of Self Development (55)
  3. Orientation towards Positive Values (56)
  4. Enhanced Self-Regard and Self-Esteem (27, 57–59)
  5. Enhanced Inner Well-Being (31)
  6. Increased Emotional Stability (60–62)

Reduction of Negative Qualities

  1. Decreased Anxiety (27, 61–65)
  2. Decreased Tension (60, 63)
  3. Decreased Depression (57, 60–61)
  4. Decreased Hostility and Aggression (66–67)
  5. Decreased Impulsiveness (68)
  6. Less Sensitivity to Criticism (57)

3. Improved Health
Increased Energy and Dynamism

  1. Increased Energy and Enthusiasm (27, 63, 69)
  2. Increased Physical and Mental Well-Being (31, 68)
  3. Decreased Fatigue (63)

Reduction of Stress-Related Health Problems

  1. Reduction of High Blood Pressure in Adolescents and Adults (70–72)
  2. Decreased Insomnia (73)

Reduction of Health Care Costs

  1. Lower Health Insurance Utilization Rates: Significantly Fewer Hospital Inpatient Days, and Outpatient Visits in All Age Categories; Fewer Inpatient Admissions for All Major Categories of Disease (74)
  2. Longitudinal Reduction in Health Care Costs (75)

Scientific Research References
for Findings Cited in this Document

  1. (1) Journal of Conflict Resolution 32: 776–812, 1988; Journal of Crime and Justice 4: 25–45, 1981; The Journal of Mind and Behavior 8: 67–104, 1987; The Journal of Mind and Behavior 9: 457–486, 1988; Psychology, Crime, and Law 2: 165–174, 1996.
    1. (2) The Journal of Mind and Behavior 9: 457–486, 1988; Social Indicators Research
    2. 47: 153–201, 1999.
  2. (3) Journal of Conflict Resolution 32: 776–812, 1988.
  3. (4) Social Indicators Research 47: 153–201, 1999.
  4. (5) The Journal of Mind and Behavior 8: 67–104, 1987; Dissertation Abstracts International 51(12): 1991.
  5. (6) Dissertation Abstracts International 51(12): 1991.
  6. (7) Social Indicators Research 22: 399–418, 1990.
  7. (8) Proceedings of the American Statistical Association, Business and Economics Statistics Section: 799–804, 1987; 491–496, 1988; 565–570, 1989.
  8. (9) Dissertation Abstracts International 61(4): 2271B, 2000.
  9. (10) Psychological Reports 76: 1171–1193, 1995.
  10. (11) American Statistical Association, 1996 Proceedings of the Social Statistics Section, pp. 38–43.
  11. (12) Journal of Offender Rehabilitation 36: 283–302, 2003.
  12. (13) Journal of Social Behavior and Personality 17: 285–338, 2005.
  13. (14) Social Science Perspectives Journal 2(4): 80–94, 1988; Proceedings of the American Statistical Association, Social Science Statistics Section: 297–302, 1990.
  14. (15) Human Physiology 25: 171–180, 1999.
  15. (16) Zeitschrift für Elektroenzephalographie und Elektromyographie EEG-EMG 7: 99– 103, 1976.
  16. (17) International Journal of Neuroscience 10: 165–170, 1980.
  17. (18) Motivation, Motor and Sensory Processes of the Brain, Progress in Brain Research 54: 447–453, 1980.
  18. (19) Psychophysiology 27 (Suppl.): 4A (Abstract), 1990.
  19. (20) Psychophysiology 14: 293–296, 1977.
  20. (21) Physiology & Behavior 59: 399–402, 1996.
  21. (22) International Journal of Neuroscience 14: 147–151, 1981.
  22. (23) Psychosomatic Medicine 46: 267–276, 1984.
  23. (24) Scientific Research on Maharishi’s Transcendental Meditation and TM-Sidhi Programme: Collected Papers, Volume 1: 705–712, 1977.
  24. (25) International Journal of Neuroscience 54: 1–12, 1990.
  25. (26) Gedrag: Tijdschrift voor Psychologie 3: 167–182, 1975.
  26. (27) Dissertation Abstracts International 38(7): 3372B–3373B, 1978.
  27. (28) Personality and Individual Differences 12: 1105–1116, 1991.
  28. (29) Intelligence 29: 419–440, 2001.
  29. (30) Higher Education Research and Development 15: 73–82, 1995.
  30. (31) Journal of Personality and Social Psychology 57: 950–964, 1989.
  31. (32) Memory & Cognition 10: 207–215, 1982.
  32. (33) Journal of Social Behavior and Personality 17: 65–91, 2005.
  33. (34) Journal of Social Behavior and Personality 17: 47–64, 2005.
  34. (35) International Journal of Neuroscience 15: 151–157, 1981.
  35. (36) Perceptual and Motor Skills 65: 613–614, 1987.
  36. (37) Perceptual and Motor Skills 39: 1031–1034, 1974.
  37. (38) Journal of Creative Behavior 13: 169–180, 1979.
  38. (39) The Journal of Creative Behavior 19: 270–275, 1985.
  39. (40) Academy of Management Journal 17: 362–368, 1974. See also Anxiety, Stress and Coping: An International Journal 6: 245–262, 1993.
  40. (41) Anxiety, Stress and Coping: An International Journal 6: 245–262, 1993. See also International Journal of Neuroscience 29: 45–55, 1986.
  41. (42) Zeitschrift für klinische Psychologie 7: 235–255, 1978; Anxiety, Stress and Coping: An International Journal 6: 245–262, 1993.
  42. (43) Journal of Counseling Psychology 20: 565–566, 1973; Journal of Social Behavior and Personality 6: 189–247, 1991.
  43. (44) Personality and Individual Differences 12: 1105–1116, 1991
  44. (45) Psychosomatic Medicine 35: 341–349, 1973; International Journal of Neuroscience 46: 77–86, 1989.
  45. (46) Academy of Management Journal 17: 362–368, 1974; Anxiety, Stress and Coping: An International Journal 6: 245–262, 1993.
  46. (47) Anxiety, Stress and Coping: An International Journal 6: 245–262, 1993.
  47. (48) Academy of Management Journal 17: 362–368, 1974
    1. (49) College Student Journal 15: 140–146, 1981; Zeitschrift für klinische Psychologie
    2. 7: 235–255, 1978; Dissertation Abstracts International 38(8): 3895B, 1978.
  48. (50) Psychological Reports 51: 887–890, 1982.
  49. (51) Dissertation Abstracts International 45(10): 3206B, 1985.
  50. (52) Journal of Counseling Psychology 19: 184–187, 1972.
  51. (53) Journal of Counseling Psychology 20: 565–566, 1973.
  52. (54) Journal of Social Behavior and Personality 6: 189–247, 1991.
  53. (55) Journal of Social Behavior and Personality 17: 93–121, 2005.
  54. (56) Perceptual and Motor Skills 64: 1003–1012, 1987.
  55. (57) Gedrag: Tijdschrift voor Psychologie 4: 206–218, 1976.
  56. (58) Dissertation Abstracts International 38(6): 3351A, 1977.
  57. (59) Dissertation Abstracts International 34(8): 4732A, 1974.
  58. (60) Zeitschrift für klinische Psychologie 7: 235–255, 1978.
  59. (61) Journal of Counseling and Development 64: 212–215, 1985.
  60. (62) Psychotherapie • Psychosomatik Medizinische Psychologie 32: 188–192, 1982.
  61. (63) Anxiety, Stress and Coping 6: 245–262, 1993.
  62. (64) Journal of Clinical Psychology 33: 1076–1078, 1977.
  63. (65) Journal of Clinical Psychology 45: 957–974, 1989.
  64. (66) Criminal Justice and Behavior 5: 3–20, 1978.
  65. (67) Journal of Offender Rehabilitation 36: 127–160, 2003.
  66. (68) Japanese Journal of Industrial Health 32: 656, 1990.
  67. (69) Dissertation Abstracts International 38(8): 3895B, 1978.

(70) Journal of Psychosomatic Research 51: 597–605, 2001.

  1. (71) American Journal of Hypertension 17: 366–369, 2004; 18: 88–98, 2005.
  2. (72) Hypertension 26: 820–827, 1995; 28: 228–237, 1996.
  3. (73) Journal of Counseling and Development 64: 212–215, 1985.
  4. (74) Psychosomatic Medicine 49: 493–507, 1987.
  5. (75) American Journal of Health Promotion 10: 208–216, 1996; 14: 284–291, 2000.