Appendix 6

The following sections outline scientific research findings on Maharishi Ayur-Veda Herbal Food Supplements and Maharishi Vedic Organic Agriculture products. The numbers in parentheses after the findings below refer to the publication references of the original research papers, which are listed at the end of this document.

1. Effects of Maharishi Ayur-Veda Herbal Food Supplements

(Cell Culture and Clinical Studies)

“Amrit Kalash” Maharishi Ayur-Veda Herbal Food Supplement

  1. Effective Scavenging of Free Radicals (1000 times more effective than
    vitamin C, vitamin E, or the drug Probucol) (1, 2, 3, 4)

 • Reduced Cardiovascular Risk Factors:
—Reduction of Platelet Aggregation (5)
—Reduced Oxidation of Human Low-Density Lipoprotein (4, 6)
—Reduced Frequency of Angina Pectoris (7)
—Inhibition of Lipid Oxidation in Patients with Hyperlipidemia (8)
—Decreased Lipid Peroxide and Decreased Anginal Frequency in Ischemic

    1. Heart Disease Patients (9)
    2. • Cancer Prevention and Treatment
      —Reversion of Neuroblastoma Tumor Cells to Normal Cell Functioning in
    3. Tissue Culture Experiments (10)
      —Inhibition of Malignant Transformation In Vitro (11)
  1. Reduced Toxicity of Chemotherapeutic Drugs (9, 12)
  2. Neurotransmitter Change Associated with Pain Relief and Reduced
    Inflammation (13)
  3. Improvement in Age-Related Cognitive Measures in Adults (14)
  4. Improvement in Health Symptoms (15)

Other Maharishi Ayur-Veda Herbal Food Supplements

  1. Improvement in Non-Insulin-Dependent Diabetes Mellitus—Reduced Fasting and Postprandial Blood Glucose; Decreased Serum Total Cholesterol and Triglycerides; Decreased Polyuria, Fatigue, and Constipation (16)
  2. Decreased Insomnia (17)
  3. Decreased Symptoms of Generalized Anxiety Disorder (18)
    —Reduction of General Anxiety
    —Reduction of Anxiety Caused by Challenging Situation
    —Reduction of Stress Hormone (Cortisol)

• Increased Intelligence (19)

2. Maharishi Vedic Organic Agriculture— Most Vital and Nutritious Food

Maharishi Vedic Organic Agriculture makes use of the knowledge of Natural Law available in modern science and Maharishi’s Vedic Science to produce food that is not only organic—which means free from the poisonous chemicals used in contemporary industrial agriculture—but Vedic organic, which means making use of Vedic technologies to produce food that has the most vitality and nutrition for health of the whole population.

Research in recent years has confirmed the health benefits of organic agriculture. For example, organic fruits, vegetables, and grains have higher levels of essential nutrients (20). Organic food not only contains fewer pesticides, but consumption of organic food has been shown to quickly eliminate poisonous residues in school children (21). Organic food also helps prevent the risks to infant health and development posed by exposure by infants and even their parents to poisonous herbicides and pesticides (22). Organic farming, compared to conventional chemical farming, is found to be both more economically sustainable and more environmentally sustainable (23).

An example of the purity and additional nutritional benefit of Maharishi Vedic Organic Agriculture can be seen in the case of Maharishi Vedic Honey. The purity of Maharishi Vedic Honey is confirmed by research indicating that in testing seven samples for over 40 chloro-pesticides and phosphorous pesticides, none of the pesticides were detectable (24). One important measure of nutritional value is evaluation of the natural antibacterial property of honey: In contrast to another brand of honey well-known for its strong antibacterial property, research found that Maharishi Vedic Honey further reduced bacteria count by 90% in one hour in a 20 times diluted honey solution; similar results were found for other dilution ratios and time intervals (25). Other research studies found Maharishi Vedic Honey to have very high levels of antioxidants (protection from free radical damage to the body) and uniquely high vital quality (26).

Scientific Research References
for Findings Listed in this Document

(1) Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology Journal 5: A1284 (Abstract), 1991.
(2) The Pharmacologist 32: 155 (Abstract), 1990.

  1. (3) Indian Journal of Clinical Practice 1: 23–27, 1991.
  2. (4) Pharmacology, Biochemistry, and Behavior 43: 1175–1182, 1992.
  3. (5) Clinica & Terapia Cardiovascolare 8: 227–230, 1989.
  4. (6) Complementary Medicine International 3: 28–36, 1996.
  5. (7) Journal of the Association of Physicians of India 42: 466–467, 1994.
  6. (8) The American Journal of the Medical Sciences 314: 303–310, 1997.
  7. (9) Federation of the American Societies for Experimental Biology Journal 14: A121 (Abstract), 2000.

(10) Neuropharmacology 31: 599–607, 1992.

  1. (11) Proceedings of the American Association for Cancer Research 21: 128 (Abstract), 1991.
    1. (12) Proceedings of the XVI International Cancer Congress, vol. 1, eds. R.S. Rao,
    2. M.G. Deo, and L.D. Sanghvi (Bologna, Italy: Monduzzi Editore): 3099–3102, 1994.
  2. (13) The Journal of Research and Education in Indian Medicine 10: 1–8, 1991.
  3. (14) International Journal of Psychosomatics 37: 25–29, 1990.
  4. (15) Federation of the American Societies for Experimental Biology Journal 5: A1317 (Abstract), 1991.
  5. (16) Alternative Therapies in Clinical Practice 3: 26–31, 1996.
  6. (17) Complementary Therapies in Medicine 11: 223–225, 2003.
  7. (18) Journal of Clinical Psychopharmacology 22(4): 443–444, 2002.
  8. (19) Personality and Individual Differences 15: 599–602, 1993.
  9. (20) Food Additives and Contaminants 19: 427–446, 2002.
    1. (21) Environmental Health Perspectives 109: 299–303, 2001; 111: 377–382, 2003;
    2. 114: 260–263, 2006.
  1. (22) Environmental Health Perspectives 105: 308–314, 1997; 112: 69–78, 2004; 112: 631–635, 2004.
  2. (23) Nature 410: 926– 930, (19 April) 2001.
  3. (24) Quality Services International GmbH, Bremen, Germany: Ref. 58727 (10 September 2003); Ref. 58728 (10 September 2003); Ref. 62467 (20 November 2003); Ref. 68223 (26 February 2004); Ref. 71181 (16 April 2004); Ref. 71829 (10 May 2004); Ref. 75091 (16 June 2004).
  4. (25) Food Research Laboratory, Tokyo Food Sanitation Association, Tokyo, Japan (Reference number 01911, 16 September 2003).
  5. (26) Antioxidants: Research Conducted by Brunswick Laboratories, Wareham, MA, USA (Ref. B-1590/8-28-03; B-1670/10-19-03; B-1741/11-10-03; B-1962/2-2604; B-2058/4-2-04; B-2106/4-22-04); Vital quality: Society of Goetheistic Research (23 June 2004).